The Conversation Collective

The idea for this website began developing on a long scenic drive from Phoenix Arizona to El Paso Texas. After the wedding of a friend where I talked with both familiar and new people I began thinking about the way people recommend things in conversation. It begins with a common interest and like wildfire you start volleying back and forth. “Have you heard of…?” “I think you would really like…” “That reminds me of this other thing” and so on and so forth. I was reliving some of those conversations and reveling in the feeling of finding something I’d never heard of. These referrals build on one another infinitely. In a world where people are constantly creating it’s exciting to share in discovery and learning with those around you. One problem was that I am separated from so many people I have, or could have, these experiences with. This collective will be an experiment in an effort to bridge gaps of distance and time, to build community, and to share life.

Recommendations will encompass a virtually limitless spectrum. From a new book you’re reading to an old one you’ve loved, an article that sparked your interest, music you wish the whole world could hear, art that moves and inspires you, a story you wrote, a website that needs to be shared, a business worth patronizing, an activity someone else should try, an idea sprouting in your head, or anything else you want to share.

To begin:

Music album: b’lieve i’m goin down by Kurt Vile:

This record was perhaps easy to miss, but easily could snuggle its way into anybody’s ‘best-of 2015’ list.  Do you know Kurt?

Kurt Vile:  Likeable Kurt Vile:  Father Kurt Vile:  Unheralded anti-prodigy Kurt Vile:  Sophisticated Funnyman Kurt:  Vile

I first saw the man whilst he was opening a set in the Hollywood Cemetery for Connor Oberst’s Bright Eyes (Don’t even trip dog! Bright eyes ruled and you know it.)  He was hidden behind long dirty locks of hair but the sound he offered that night made the tiny hairs on my neck give up any notion of getting distracted.  Now don’t get me wrong, I didn’t run out and snatch up every record he’d ever made (and there’s a grip I tell you) in fact I listened to relatively little of his songwriting after that.  Listening to this album felt like catching up with an old friend: The friend that never judged you The friend whose face never changes but that you can’t quite picture The friend who will be there 20 years from now even if you don’t speak until then. The songs on ‘B’lieve I’m Goin Down are the perfect companion for road trips, airplanes, soundtracks and bedroom corners.

(also see: Feel-good-not-feeling-good-tunes)  

– David Webster

Book: If On a Winter’s Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino:  Not a new book, but a great one. Calvino’s postmodernist narrative explores the idea of beginnings by never losing sight of them. The reader finds herself questioning the relationship of the reader to a text, of the text to it’s author, and to other writing.  In reading this book I am at once distanced from the story, and forced to relate to it more intimately than with most books where I am simply the observer. Since starting this book I’ve been challenged to be a more responsible, aware reader and freaked out a little by how Calvino seemed like he was in my bedroom watching me read it.  – Jessica S Webster

Anime: Code Geass: Rightly so, Anime has a bad rap of being something that is hyper sexualized, primarily constructed for the geeky inclined and a place for adults to prolong that season of their lives consumed with cartoons.  Though I believe a majority of anime can rightly be criticized for the above, Code Geass stands apart. It is the story of a boy on a quest for vengeance, against a malicious father. The boy, Lelouch Lamperouge, attempts to remake the world in his vision of justice through what we can safely call magic and wit. I love this story because it is a classic “strike against the heavens in self-righteous disdain”. It has awesome robot fights, scorned love, and asks freakin huge questions like can justice be brought about through power and is hope the final opponent to peace. 50 episodes, 19 mins each, total time 16 hours.  justchris

 

 

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